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Peak Oil Matters

A fresh perspective on the concept of peak oil and the challenges we face

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Tag: geopolitical

 

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We have a problem with oil production now—not just here in the United States—and it is not going to get better. The cancellation of exploration and production projects does not occur in a parallel universe! If production is being curtailed, that we have enough today to meet demand is not the beginning and end of supply concerns

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Peak oil’s message is rather simple once all of the fluff and distractions are set aside. It’s about a recognition that we are dealing with a finite resource used extensively for decades upon decades by ever-increasing numbers for ever-increasing needs.

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The truths, unpleasant though they may be, are the truths: inexpensive, readily available oil is slowly but surely becoming less readily available, more expensive, and harder to come by. Current conditions [ultra-low prices; curtailed/canceled oil production and exploration projects; over-supply; declining investments; high debt] only highlight that the problems of maintaining an adequate, affordable, accessible supply of fossil fuel needed to power modern society aren’t going away.

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Amazingly, there are many people who believe in peak oil.…

Michael Lynch offered that comment early in a not surprisingly vague article arguing peak oil this past summer. [Not that vague is a new tactic for him. Five years ago, Chris Nelder offered a concise analysis of Lynch’s work, and not much appears to have changed]: continue reading…

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If they don’t get it [doubtful], then they either need to learn some basics, or write about what they know.
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Those of us paying attention to oil supply issues are on occasion torn by decisions as to whether to simply be amused by the maddening, cherry-picked attempts at analysis of the “myth” of peak oil [similar to the myth of gravity], or  just annoyed as hell that even the simplest concepts are either lied about or are so baffling to the anti-fact crowds that their only option is to nonetheless display their lack of understanding by passing along nonsense and misleading pseudo-facts to an unsuspecting public. continue reading…

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A few more thoughts about transportation and the looming challenges we’ll face in the years ahead as our fossil fuel supplies become more challenging to develop and distribute. continue reading…

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[I]f crude oil had not peaked and the price of oil remained at around $25 per barrel, the US would be spending around $1.5 billion less per day on oil, or $543 billion less per year. Most importantly, however, the US would be spending almost $600 million less per day on oil imports, or $216 billion less per year. continue reading…

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An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Dr. Nafeez Ahmed (quoting Lieutenant Colonel Daniel L. Davis): continue reading…

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At the risk of starting a cat fight where truth may too quickly become a casualty, why don’t we more forcefully challenge those who deny peak oil (and global warming) and who do so for reasons that generally ignore reality in favor of narrowly-defined interests? Those motivations continue reading…