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Peak Oil Matters

A fresh perspective on the concept of peak oil and the challenges we face

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Tag: economics

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The economic paradigm we are currently engaged in must change in order to end our oil obsessed economy simply because no alternative energy resource will yield equal energy outputs. A realistic shared vision of what global prosperity might look like in an age of depleting resources is required to align economic and social aspirations, and de-couple monetary growth from synonymy with prosperity. Prosperity must become tantamount with values such as the environment, grass-roots democracy, and social justice. Importantly, global society must share these ideals; it would be futile for one state to re-evaluate their perceptions of prosperity if others are unwilling to do so (links/citations in original quote). [1]

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Americans only want to hear about the promise of ‘energy independence;’ they don’t want to hear that independence will ultimately mean higher prices. [1] 

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It’s been quite a while—several years, actually, since my last post on transportation issues. But it’s still as important as ever; more so, if that’s possible. More than 90% of all transportation systems depend on fossil fuels—oil and gasoline, specifically. continue reading…

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This is the second part of an examination of the outstanding working paper entitled A Critique of Techno-Optimism: Efficiency without Sufficiency is Lost by Dr. Samuel Alexander * in which he examines the longstanding belief that no matter what society’s problems in an endless quest for more and better, technology will provide and resolve in due course. continue reading…

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In order to break the addiction to oil, economies dependent on oil will need to invest huge amounts of money and energy in building new social and economic infrastructures that are not so heavily dependent on oil (e.g. efficient public transport systems to continue reading…

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[I]f crude oil had not peaked and the price of oil remained at around $25 per barrel, the US would be spending around $1.5 billion less per day on oil, or $543 billion less per year. Most importantly, however, the US would be spending almost $600 million less per day on oil imports, or $216 billion less per year. continue reading…