Skip to content

Peak Oil Matters

A fresh perspective on the concept of peak oil and the challenges we face

Archive

Category: Peak Oil: Worth Pondering

01320023

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Kurt Cobb.

[H]ere is where we get to the motivations behind the sunny optimism of the oil industry. If the public understood that oil supplies might be nearing an irreversible decline, it would demand the deployment of alternative fuels and efficiency measures to soften the blow in order to give us time for a transition to a society based on something other than oil. That would ultimately reduce demand for oil products and eventually end our dependence on oil. Oil companies might get stuck with significant inventories in the ground that they cannot sell, at least not at the prices or in the quantities they would like.
The more immediate problem for oil company executives is that their companies may soon find it impossible to replace all their oil reserves

Still trying to figure out the benefits of withholding facts….Haven’t come up with anything solid as yet.

There’s little doubt that the public is going to suffer needlessly in the years to come if the oil industry, our political leaders, and the media don’t declare a moratorium on fact-free Happy Talk about our vast, massive resources. It’s long past the time when we need to respect the citizens of this country and start sharing facts—all of them, not just the specially-selected ones which keeps the oil industry afloat, business media at bay, and politicians safe for one more term.

Yes, we have abundant resources underground. That’s not the end of the story and it’s barely the beginning. It’s hard to imagine that oil industry officials are not painfully aware of the fossil fuel supply challenges looming. It’s just as difficult to imagine they’re not making a contingency plan or two for themselves (whatever the hell that might be).

Waiting until their problems are nearly insurmountable before they begin a massive overhaul of what they do seems fairly idiotic—my limited oil industry experience notwithstanding. The benefit to the public in not laying out all the facts while failing to enlist commercial and political assistance across the board to start planning for a different energy future … this strategy will make things better … how?

~ My Photo: el Conquistador, San Juan, PR – 02.24.06

 Looking Left and Right:
Inspiring Different Ideas,
Envisioning Better Tomorrows

 Peak Oil Matters is dedicated to informing others about the significance and impact of Peak Oil—while adding observations about politics, ideology, transportation, and smart growth.
            – Look for my new website going live next week

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Chris Nelder.

[T]here is no intellectually honest way to believe that the world can continue its
near-total reliance on fossil fuels for much more than another decade — a paltry window of opportunity. We also know that we cannot wait until they go into decline before reaching for renewables and efficiency, simply because the scale of the challenge is so vast, and the alternatives are starting from such a low level that they will need decades of investment before they are ready to assume the load. The data is clear, and the mathematics are really quite straightforward.
The hard truth is that there are no good fuel substitutes anymore. Throughout human history, we have always been able to find not just a substitute fuel, but a better one: a cheaper, denser, more abundant one. That is simply no longer the case. One may hope for some miraculous technological breakthrough, and one may simply have faith that the invisible hand will solve our problems, but such thin threads are hardly a reasonable basis for policymaking and forecasting.

The truth about alternative sources—and especially the great wonders of tight oil and the tar sands and oil shale out West—continues to be much different than the fanciful “might possibly,” “could potentially,” and their half-truth, disingenuous brethren touted by those with a vested interest in keeping oil production first in line at the profit trough.

What’s being developed, admirable as the technology and ingenuity are, simply will not be enough. The message can be no simpler or straightforward. It’s the Peak Oil bottom line.

We’re just about at the end of the (relatively) easily accessible, (tolerably) affordable, and energy-dense supplies of the conventional oil resources which have powered us all for more than 150 years. What’s “available” does not share those important attributes. They are inferior by almost any measure, and in a world where billions seek to join us in sharing the magnificent technological marvels of modern-day living, we just are not going to have enough of what we all need and/or demand.

Worse still, every day that our nitwit leaders decide that investments in public transportation, education, smart growth, and renewable energy sources should be relegated to the sidelines in favor of their one-note energy policy of Drill More, Everywhere is one less day we’ll all have to plan for and implement what we can only hope will be an efficient transition away from our dependency on the marvelous but finite conventional oil resources.

Still trying to figure out why shooting ourselves in the foot is such a good idea.

~ My Photo: Niebaum-Coppola Winery, Napa Valley, CA – 09.03.04

 Looking Left and Right:
Inspiring Different Ideas,
Envisioning Better Tomorrows

 Peak Oil Matters is dedicated to informing others about the significance and impact of Peak Oil—while adding observations about politics, ideology, transportation, and smart growth. (Sarcasm at no charge).
            – Look for my new website coming soon

IMGP3092

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from James Greenberger:

The real energy crisis is neither a geologic crisis nor a strategic crisis.  The real energy crisis is a slow growth crisis.  Although the oil industry has figured out a way technologically to recover large quantities of unconventional oil, the cost of doing so will be staggering.  Conventional oil, which may cost $4-6 per barrel to lift out of a Saudi Arabian well, may cost more than $100 per barrel to lift out deep water deposits off the coast of Brazil.  And the lift costs will only go up, as each barrel of oil becomes progressively more difficult and expensive to recover.
The result is a hyper-inflation of energy costs, as the fixed, structural cost of petroleum spirals ever higher.  As more and more resources must be invested in petroleum production, fewer and fewer resources will be available for other productive parts of the economy.
In ordinary markets, the market self-corrects by incenting substitution for a high priced commodity.  But the petroleum market is no ordinary market.  The energy needs of the transportation sector are almost entirely dependent upon petroleum; no easy substitutes are available.  As a consequence, as petroleum costs hyper inflate, the economy will slow as consumers compensate by using less energy.  This lowers demand for oil, which depresses its price, which in turn slows investment in alternate fuel technologies.

It seems fairly obvious, doesn’t it? The “surge” in oil production and the imminent arrival of “energy independence” touted by industry spokespeople rarely includes any discussion of this vital component to energy production and what that means for all of us.

For all the benefits of magic technology and human ingenuity as repeated endlessly from Page One of the denier’s playbook, we don’t have the surge in production from tight oil and in shale gas if prices aren’t high enough to justify the investments by fossil fuel industry. If there aren’t reasonable expectations of profits, no company out of the goodness of its corporate heart is going to be fracking anything or anywhere.

There is another end to that same stick: high prices justifying increased investments are also high prices to consumers. Sliding past that explanation serves the industry’s purposes, but the same comprehensive explanation of all factors lacking in other aspects of this great production increase seems MIA here as well.

At some point, we’re going to have to collectively make some determinations about where we allocate financial and production resources as we decide what kind of energy policy we will need this century and beyond. In order to do so, citizens need all facts and a better understanding of what’s involved and what is at stake.

As I have insisted in numerous posts, the public bears responsibility for educating themselves. But if key sources of information conveniently omit important parts of the story, citizens cannot make informed decisions. That only leads to more problems down the road.

I still think there are better strategies to pursue.

~ My Photo: The Florida Everglades – 03.02.12

 Looking Left and Right:
Inspiring Different Ideas,
Envisioning Better Tomorrows

 Peak Oil Matters is dedicated to informing others about the significance and impact of Peak Oil—while adding observations about politics, ideology, transportation, and smart growth. (Sarcasm at no charge).
            – Look for my new website coming soon

071010 040

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Michel Desjardins:

We have become increasingly aware that there are fundamental constraints to ongoing economic expansion, that perpetual growth on a finite planet is a fool’s dream.
If Peak Oil is here – and there is solid evidence showing that it is – then it means we have begun to run up against the planet’s natural constraints. Mother Nature has begun to tell us that the party is over.
It’s an uncomfortable thought, but one that can no longer be ignored.
We can no longer assume that decades of economic and population growth based on ever-increasing rates of resource extraction, manufacturing, and consumption can continue….
Peak Oil is a problem like no other….
It is truly a game-changer….
Communities that are quick to recognize the problem stand a better chance of weathering the storm….
We need to find ways to dramatically reduce our dependence on fossil fuel energies, start promoting local agriculture, alternative methods of transportation and energy efficiency.
Bottom line: we need to build our community’s capacity to adapt to a very different world.

The article from which that quote was extracted is more than two years old, and was written by a Canadian. [The link may no longer be accessible.] I don’t recall that the author of that piece had any connection to the oil industry, but his assessment then was no less accurate. It has greater significance now.

There continues to be a great deal of hype about fracking and tight oil, with some now convinced that Peak Oil is “dead.” Of course, when your commentary about all of this increased production neglects to mention much, if anything, about the downside of this path to energy independence, it’s easy to dismiss reality.

There’s no doubt that the production increases from shale have caused a noteworthy surge in production. But that’s only half the story, although it’s clearly the happier side. What the cheerleaders fail to tell us time and again is that there’s an eye-opening rate of depletion in the tight oil fields. More rigs and wells are needed just to stay even, and none of them are free. In fact, they cost a great deal more than do conventional wells.

There are also solid indications about water contamination, not to mention the incredible amounts of water needed in the process to begin with. The integrity-free failure to disclose the chemical compounds used in fracking isn’t exactly a plus, either. Those are just a few of the annoying facts which tarnish all that happy talk.

And as is true of conventional crude production, most of the “good spots” have been found and tapped. More expense, more effort, and more risk is now the norm. That’s not a winning formula for continuing production increases. Losing money tends not to be a primary objective for most oil producers. When the losses start piling up and investors start backing away, it’s a bit of a challenge to maintain any decent levels of production.

And so the end result is that Peak Oil indeed remains a “game-changer.” The more of us who recognize this by slicing through the Happy Talk to understand the full story and not just the cherry-picked good parts, the sooner we can start the necessary discussions about what to do. Many of those important conversations and plans will have to occur at the local levels. The federal government will have a role to play, but we can’t turn the keys over to it and assume all will be well.

Crisis? Opportunity? I’m a fan of Option B.

[NOTE: Traveling the rest of this week. Next posting on Monday, June 3]

~ My Photo: Good Harbor Beach, MA – 07.10.10

Look for my new website, coming soon!

100_0009

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Jorge Madrid, Kate Gordon, Tina Ramos:

The United States’ prolonged unwillingness to develop a long-term, sustainable energy strategy has left us with a daunting challenge—the need to run a 21st century economy using 20th century energy sources and infrastructure. Our energy choices, or lack thereof due to the dominance of fossil fuels, have caused irreparable damage to the environment and public health, have caused our country to forego countless economic opportunities, and have made us far more vulnerable to fossil fuel price volatility than ever before. Not to mention that our relentless inaction on climate change mitigation and adaptation has left every state’s communities, local economies, and natural resources at risk.

And this is a problem? Imagine that!

It’s fine to have our own philosophical and ideological beliefs. At some point, however, those positions collide with facts. When that happens, as it invariably does, decisions have to be made. Better they be made with knowledge of and understanding those facts.

With that as the base, one can decide on the merits whether it’s best to stand on principle no matter what, or find a means to preserve the beliefs which matter most while adapting to the realities at hand. Failure to make compromises when needed can leave one with beliefs intact and no viable means of expressing them to anyone other than the person in the mirror.

We have some energy supply matters, and we have a warming planet. The facts are there for all to see. Choosing to deny them all; seeking some irrational basis about conspiracies instead; or following the lead of “leaders” who increasingly have an agenda very different than that of their constituents … there are consequences to each and all of those options. They’re inevitable.

There will only be so many more opportunities for us—collectively—to set aside the ideologies and deal with the facts about our energy supply and warming planet. Failure to take the time now to understand all of the considerations, not just the ones which make us feel better and less discomfited by what’s at stake and what roles we must play, will leave us with no option but to endure painful, stringent adaptations forced upon us. That’s not nearly as good an option as it sounds.

How much longer should we rely on a decision-making process marked by selected, self-serving facts as the sole basis for acting in our own—and our children’s—best interests now and in the many years to come? We own the choice….

~ My Photo: Korean War Memorial, Washington, D.C. – 08.30.03

Look for my new website, coming soon!

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Richard Heinberg:

The oil problem can be summed up simply: Fossil fuel supply boosters know how to add, but they’ve forgotten how to subtract. Seeing new production coming on line from North Dakota, for example, they extrapolate this growth trend far into the future and forecast oil independence for the nation. But most US oilfields are seeing declining rates of production, and individual wells in North Dakota have especially rapid decline rates (up to 90 percent in the first year). Do the subtraction properly, and it’s plain that net supplies will continue growing only if drilling rates climb exponentially. That, again, spells higher production costs and higher oil prices. If the economy cannot support higher prices, and hence high drilling rates, then net total rates of production will drop. The one future that is impossible to achieve in any realistic scenario—low prices and high production rates—is precisely what is being promised by politicians and oil industry PR hacks.

Glossing over facts, details, reality … favored strategies for those whose livelihood depends on maintaining the illusion that our oil supply problems have gone the way of the dinosaurs. It succeeds in large part because we’re conditioned to diminish if not completely ignore/deny problems which don’t seem to be fully-formed today, or are simply too large with so much potential for havoc to wrap our minds around them.

Those advocates of nearly-unlimited oil abundance and energy independence at last mention the  high oil prices supporting the great shale/tight oil boom and then quickly zoom off into elaborate assessments of why the Peak Oil “theory” is still so much nonsense. But let’s back the bus up just a bit.

High oil prices are the very reason why the oil industry is going great guns in exploring and extracting the “vast” reserves here in the United States. How many of us non-oil industry officials are similarly delighted by high oil prices? For those of us who still consider basic math to be part of the world we live in and subject to exactly zero dispute about its usefulness, when we are allocating larger portions of a fixed budget on one necessity, less is available for everything else. This is a good thing for us?

Our standard response is that we all start cutting back here and there, including how much fossil fuel we use. And if you are are a seller, and fewer people are buying what you sell, keeping prices high isn’t exactly a winning strategy. So Mr. Seller drops his prices to entice more of you to buy his stuff, and the dominoes begin to tumble.

And when oil prices drop, Mr. Oil Seller stops investing and producing and extracting, just as Richard Heinberg explained. And when Mr. Oil Seller isn’t supplying the same amounts, oil abundance stops being oil abundance.

It’s really not that complicated once both sides of the story are offered to us for consideration. Who benefits when only part of the story is told? It’s not me, and I’m pretty damn certain it’s not you, either.

Perhaps some honest discussion and a bit of planning might be a good idea?

~ My Photo: Coffins Beach, Gloucester MA – 07.27.10

I’m passing along some useful/informative Peak Oil-related articles of note [and some political ones, too, which in one way or another will have considerable bearing on what we do and don’t do as Peak Oil makes its presence felt], all of which crossed my desk during the prior month … in case you missed them!

Enjoy.

~ ~ ~

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Energy-Voices/2013/0303/US-oil-production-Don-t-believe-the-hype

Kurt Cobb
03.03.13
US oil production: Don’t believe the hype

~ ~ ~

http://www.psmag.com/environment/the-energy-debate-we-arent-having-53400/

Lisa Margonelli
03.05.13
The Energy Debate We Aren’t Having

~ ~ ~

http://truth-out.org/news/item/14958-us-climate-bomb-is-ticking-what-the-gas-industry-doesnt-want-you-to-know

Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers
03.06.13
US Climate Bomb is Ticking: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want You to Know

~ ~ ~

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/112561/sequestration-2013-ignore-rush-limbaugh-budget-cuts-are-real#

Jonathan Cohn
03.01.13
Just Because the World Didn’t End Doesn’t Mean That Sequestration Isn’t Scary

~ ~ ~

http://capitalgainsandgames.com/blog/stan-collender/2719/why-sequester-really-happened-hint-it-has-nothing-do-deficit

Stan Collender
03.03.13
Why The Sequester Really Happened (Hint It Has Nothing To Do With The Deficit)

~ ~ ~

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/03/04/1191486/-Republicans-who-didn-t-vote-for-Violence-Against-Women-Act-say-they-did-anyway-because-why-not

Kaili Joy Gray
03.04.13
Republicans who didn’t vote for Violence Against Women Act say they did anyway because why not?

~ ~ ~

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/03/04/the-morning-plum-the-one-question-every-gop-lawmaker-should-be-asked/

Greg Sargent
03.04.13
The Morning Plum: The one question every GOP lawmaker should be asked

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/economy/even-republicans-want-progressive-economic-policies

Thom Hartmann
03.03.13
Even Republicans Want Progressive Economic Policies

~ ~ ~

http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/american-conservatism-s-crisis-of-ideas-by-j–bradford-delong

J, Bradford DeLong
02.27.13
American Conservatism’s Crisis of Ideas

~ ~ ~

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/03/sequester-real-talk-the-3-dumbest-things-about-this-truly-dumb-law/273640/

Derek Thompson
03.01.13
Sequester Real Talk: The 3 Dumbest Things About This Truly Dumb Law

~ ~ ~

http://transitionvoice.com/2013/03/do-we-have-enough-water-to-frack-our-way-to-energy-independence/

Jeff Rubin
03.04.13
Do we have enough water to frack our way to energy independence?

~ ~ ~

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/03/04/1671421/keystone-americas-backyard/

Hunter Cutting
03.04.13
Keystone: Exporting Canadian Oil Across America’s Backyard

~ ~ ~

http://www.energytrendsinsider.com/2013/03/05/why-environmentalists-are-wrong-on-keystone-xl/

Robert Rapier
03.05.13
Why Environmentalists are Wrong on Keystone XL

~ ~ ~

http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/14983-the-sequester-is-good-for-you-and-other-gop-lies

William Rivers Pitt
03.07.13
The Sequester is Good for You, and Other GOP Lies

~ ~ ~

http://prospect.org/article/what-we-have-here-failure-communicate-sort

Paul Waldman
03.07.13
What We Have Here Is a Failure to Communicate. Sort Of.

~ ~ ~

http://transitionvoice.com/2013/03/why-its-imperative-that-we-conserve-energy-now/

Tom Whipple
03.08.13
Why it’s imperative that we conserve energy now

~ ~ ~

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3920

Statement by Robert Greenstein, President
03.12.13
On Chairman Ryan’s Budget Plan

~ ~ ~

http://ourfiniteworld.com/2013/03/11/our-energy-predicament-in-charts/

Gail Tverberg
03.11.13
Our Energy Predicament in Charts

~ ~ ~

http://mondediplo.com/2013/03/09gaz

Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed
March 2013
What happens when the shale boom goes boom?

~ ~ ~

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-fracked-up-usa-shale-gas-bubble/5326504

F. William Engdahl
03.13.13
The Fracked-up USA Shale Gas Bubble

~ ~ ~

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/03/12/paul-ryans-budget-isnt-about-the-deficit/

Ezra Klein
03.12.13
Paul Ryan’s budget: Social engineering with a side of deficit reduction

~ ~ ~

http://www.salon.com/2013/03/12/how_republicans_think/

David Sirota
03.12.13
The Republican Fantasy

~ ~ ~

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-gops-real-agenda-20130313

Tim Dickinson
03.13.13
The GOP’s Real Agenda

~ ~ ~

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/03/11/what-do-you-do-when-one-party-is-this-dishonest/

Jonathan Bernstein
03.11.13
What do you do when one party is this dishonest?

~ ~ ~

http://blog.ourfuture.org/20130311/the-three-roadblocks-to-a-reality-based-conservatism

Bill Scher
03.11.13
The Three Roadblocks To a Reality-Based Conservatism

~ ~ ~

http://blog.ourfuture.org/20130318/shopping-cart-conservatism-at-cpac

Derek Pugh
03.18.13
Shopping Cart Conservatism At CPAC

~ ~ ~

http://www.salon.com/2013/03/18/boehners_debt_confession_reveals_gops_intentions/

David Sirota
03.18.13
GOP: We’ve Been Lying All Along

~ ~ ~

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/take/oil-majors-are-whistling-past-the-graveyard/584

Chris Nelder
03.20.13
Oil majors are whistling past the graveyard

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/education/37-percent-people-dont-have-clue-about-whats-going

Mark Morford
03.20.13
37 Percent of People Don’t Have a Clue About What’s Going on

~ ~ ~

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/daniel-davis/domestic-oil_b_2898256.html

Daniel Davis
03.22.13
Awash in Misinformation: America’s Domestic Tight Oil ‘Bump’

~ ~ ~

http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/gas-industry-report-calls-anti-fracking-movement-highly-effective

Katrina Rabeler
03.26.13
Gas Industry Report Calls Anti-Fracking Movement a “Highly Effective Campaign”

~ ~ ~

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/sunday-review/life-after-oil-and-gas.html

Elisabeth Rosenthal
03.23.13
Life After Oil and Gas

~ ~ ~

http://grist.org/climate-energy/can-we-shift-to-renewable-energy-yes-as-to-how/

David Roberts
03.25.13
Can we shift to renewable energy? Yes. As to how …

~ ~ ~

 

IMGP3487

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Sara Robinson:

We are so deeply invested in oil, in so many ways, that it’s almost impossible for us to envision a world beyond it. We stand to lose so much that it’s hard to fathom it all.

It is! No one who advocates for planning and education about the challenges we’ll face in the wake of Peak Oil’s onset suggests anything to the contrary.

Our entire infrastructure, most of our transportation options, and our individual as well as industrial lifestyles have been built on the back of affordable, always-at-the-ready fossil fuels. There’s not much we own or make use of in at least some fashion that is not dependent in large or small part on that energy supply.

To envision a future without that fundamental building block is not just “hard to fathom,” it’s both surreal and frightening. What the hell will we do? is not an inappropriate question to ask.

Truth be told, it’s precisely the question all of us need to start asking all the time about every facet of our daily lives—individually and collectively. At the risk of a major “Duh!”, if we’re not asking the proper questions, we’re not getting the correct answers, either. And we need correct answers—lots of them. Soon would be good.

It’s been a consistent theme of mine that we’re all at risk and thus we all have a stake in how we organize and plan for a future whose energy supply may be drastically different from the one we’ve taken for granted for so long. Everyone has a role to play. Relying on political or industrial leaders is not the first choice.

And it would be nice if those who know better yet insist on selling the public stories about abundance and independence to protect their narrow interests find the courage to admit to the truth and pitch in. Their expertise will be crucial in developing new means of supplying the energy sources we’ll need in the years to come.

When the hell do we start asking what the hell will we do?

~ My Photo: Gloucester MA Harbor – 08.30.12

 

 

 

 

 

An observation worth noting … and pondering, from Andrew McKay.

There is no alternative to oil that can be as easily extracted, transported, stored and used as oil.  There is no alternative to oil that will let us continue our lifestyles unaffected. To misunderstand this critical point is to misunderstand the predicament that peak oil puts humanity in entirely.

For all the delirium expressed in artful, cherry-picking segments of the media about our abundantly vast endlessly massive awash-ness in shale/tight oil and how we’re all just a step or two away from unlimited abundance and energy independence because of our general magnificence, the great gods of fossil fuel technology, and the sheer awesomeness of human ingenuity, reality once again pokes a stick in the eye of all that exuberance.

As is the case with most of these hyper-optimistic assessments, the full story and all the facts somehow never manage to find their way into those same pronouncements. The uninformed are thus left with the impression that but for the general awfulness of President Obama and his America-destroying agenda, we would be jes’ swimmin’ in all the oil we will ever need, forever and ever.

High depletion rates, high costs per well, the need to maintain high energy prices (coupled with an explanation of why that’s good for everyone in and out of the oil industry), the inferior quality of unconventional sources, and assorted other facts [remember back in the day when those annoying things mattered?] are almost always glossed over, if they’re mentioned at all. Unfortunately, we cannot just click our heels together once or twice and have all that magically abundant lesser-quality and more expensive fossil fuel substitutes show up at our friendly neighborhood gas station.

And the corollary is that without the full range of facts and resulting appreciation for the challenges we’ll all be facing, no discussions take place on the scale and in the scope needed to prepare ourselves for the reality of what happens when billions of people continue to make demands on a finite resource for just about everything they need. The math doesn’t work.

Perhaps one of the easily-excitable mouthpieces for the oil industry can explain how making life more difficult for more people for a longer period of time at greater cost with more problems and fewer solutions, less time, and fewer resources is in our best interests now and in the future? Not holding my breath….

~ My Photo: Balboa Island, CA – 02.11.06

I’m passing along some useful/informative Peak Oil-related articles of note [and some political ones, too, which in one way or another will have considerable bearing on what we do and don’t do as Peak Oil makes its presence felt], all of which crossed my desk during the prior month … in case you missed them!

Enjoy.

~ ~ ~

http://shalebubble.org/wall-street/

Deborah Rogers
February 2013
Shale and Wall Street: Was The Decline In Natural Gas Prices Orchestrated?

~ ~ ~

http://www.postcarbon.org/drill-baby-drill;

J. David Hughes/Post Carbon Institute
February 2013
Drill, Baby, Drill: Can Unconventional Fuels Usher in a New Era of Energy Abundance?

~ ~ ~

http://aspousa.org/2013/02/commentary-the-export-capacity-index/

Jeffrey J. Brown
02.18.13
A New Metric For Predicting Future Supplies of Global Net Oil Exports

~ ~ ~

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2013-02-05/the-twilight-of-petroleum

Antonio Turiel, Ugo Bardi
02.05.13
The Twilight of Petroleum

~ ~ ~

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/02/14/gop-approach-to-sequester-jumps-shark/

Greg Sargent
02.14.13
GOP approach to sequester jumps shark

~ ~ ~

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/larison/senate-republicans-make-a-spectacle-of-themselves/

Daniel Larison
02.14.13
Senate Republicans Make a Spectacle of Themselves

~ ~ ~

http://www.opednews.com/articles/The-Biggest-Republican-Lie-by-Robert-Reich-130213-989.html

Robert Reich
02.13.13
The Biggest Republican Lie

~ ~ ~

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2013/02/chuck_hagel_s_nomination_as_secretary_of_defense_the_republican_senators.html

Fred Kaplan
02.13.13
Why Republicans Can No Longer Be Trusted on National Security

~ ~ ~

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/bakken-shale-oil/dobb-text

Edwin Dobb
March 2013
The New Oil Landscape: The fracking frenzy in North Dakota has boosted the U.S. fuel supply—but at what cost?

~ ~ ~

http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/02/18/why-republicans-should-embrace-the-reality-of-climate-change/

Matthew Herper
02.18.13
Why Republicans Should Embrace The Reality Of Climate Change

~ ~ ~

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/01/obama-realigns-the-gop-declines-the-new-political-paradigm.html

Robert Shrum
02.021.13
Obama Realigns, the GOP Declines: The New Political Paradigm

~ ~ ~

http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/01/31/16789587-diagnosing-the-gdp-problem?lite

Steve Benen
01.31.13
Diagnosing the ‘GDP problem’

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/environment/how-our-growth-hungry-economy-has-devastated-planet-and-how-we-can-change-course

Rob Dietz and Dan O’Neill
01.22.13
How Our Growth-Hungry Economy Has Devastated the Planet — And How We Can Change Course [book excerpt]

~ ~ ~

http://www.nationaljournal.com/magazine/the-scary-truth-about-how-much-climate-change-is-costing-you-20130207?page=1

Coral Davenport
02.08.13
The Scary Truth About How Much Climate Change is Costing You

~ ~ ~

http://www.nationalmemo.com/a-new-gop-or-just-a-cosmetic-touchup/

Leonard Pitts, Jr.
02.10.13
A New GOP, Or Just A Cosmetic Touchup?

~ ~ ~

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/02/11/1186366/-Meet-Rep-Steve-Stockman-the-moron-who-thinks-Ted-Nugent-is-a-patriot

Hunter
02.11.13
Meet Rep. Steve Stockman, the moron who thinks Ted Nugent is a ‘patriot’

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/economy/gop-plan-flush-your-states-economy-down-toilet

Lynn Stuart Parramore
02.11.13
The GOP Plan to Flush Your State’s Economy Down the Toilet

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/environment/time-take-notice-how-renewable-energy-becoming-cheaper-fossil-fuels

Thom Hartmann
02.10.13
Time to Take Notice: How Renewable Energy Is Becoming Cheaper Than Fossil Fuels

~ ~ ~

http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175648/tomgram%3A_michael_klare%2C_will_the_keystone_xl_pipeline_go_down/

Michael Klare
02.10.13
Will the Keystone XL Pipeline Go Down?

~ ~ ~

http://prospect.org/article/moderates-gop-survival-guide

Jonathan Bernstein
02.07.13
The Moderate’s GOP Survival Guide

~ ~ ~

http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/12-months-misinformation-explaining-fox-news-record-low-credibility

Steven Hsieh
02.07.13
12 Months of Misinformation: Explaining Fox News’ ‘Record Low’ Credibility

~ ~ ~

http://robertreich.org/post/42429208497

Robert Reich
02.06.13
The Economic Challenge Ahead: More Jobs and Growth, Not Definite Reduction

~ ~ ~

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/02/u_s_shale_oil_are_we_headed_to_a_new_era_of_oil_abundance.single.html

Raymond T. Pierrehumbert
02.06.13
The Myth of “Saudi America”

~ ~ ~

http://www.nationalmemo.com/modern-day-know-nothings-take-control-in-the-south/

Gene Lyons
02.06.13
Modern-Day Know-Nothings Take Control In The South

~ ~ ~

http://www.nationalmemo.com/gun-nuts-fantasies-vs-real-world-tragedies/

Leonard Pitts, Jr.
02.06.13
Gun Nuts’ Fantasies Vs. Real-World Tragedies

~ ~ ~

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/twilight-of-an-energy-boom-albertas-new-fiscal-challenge/article8415713/

Gordon Piits & Nathan Vanderklippe
02.09.13
Twilight of an energy boom: Alberta’s new fiscal challenge

~ ~ ~

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/counterculture-conservatism-4001/

Andrew J. Bacevich
02.06.13
Counterculture Conservatism

~ ~ ~

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-s-lofgren/scientology-for-rednecks_b_2707087.html

Michael S. Lofgren
02.17.13
Scientology for Rednecks: What the GOP Has Become

~ ~ ~

http://blogs.law.widener.edu/climate/2013/02/12/why-politicians-may-not-ethically-rely-on-their-own-uninformed-opinion-about-climate-science-and-10-questions-that-the-press-should-ask-politicians-about-climate-science-in-light-of-this-responsibilit/

Donald Brown
February, 2013
Why Politicians May Not Ethically Rely On Their Own Uninformed Opinion About Climate Science and 10 Questions That The Press Should Ask Politicians About Climate Science In Light of This Responsibility

~ ~ ~

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/take/americas-oil-choice-pay-up-or-get-off/484

Chris Nelder
02.20.13
America’s oil choice: Pay up, or get off

~ ~ ~

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/23/deluded-republican-reformers.html

Michael Tomasky
02.23.13
Deluded Republican Reformers

~ ~ ~